Don’t bet on Getty: the downside of “free” stock photos

Getty Image embedYesterday, Getty Images announced that it would be making 35 million of its more than 90 million images available as free website embeds.

Don’t do it.

The program looks attractive. Getty is the world’s largest commercial image archive, and the lure of free access to such a rich treasure trove of eye candy for your web site is hard to resist. Here are four reasons why I’m not going to take the bait.

So I’m just saying no to “free” Getty embeds. Instead I’ll continue to use Creative Commons licensed images from Flickr and Wikimedia Commons for my blog. Finding the “right” image is sometimes challenging, but always oddly enjoyable. Join me—don’t take the Getty sucker bet.

4 thoughts on “Don’t bet on Getty: the downside of “free” stock photos

  1. Better yet take your own photos! I’m starting to do this myself and find that any kind of props I need can be found around my house. I’ve also been taking a lot of shots when out and about if they strike me as something that might be used “some day” for “some thing”. Here’s one I’ll let you have and you can use it commercially if you want.

    1. Great addition Traci! Yes, I forgot to mention that I often use my own photos for my blog posts, and your idea of looking out for shots that might be useful in the future is smart. Thank you for your amusing donation: here’s one of mine (one of these days I’ll post a list of the names of other noteworthy Anguilian businesses)

    2. Great addition Traci! I forgot to mention that I often use my own photos for my blog posts, and your idea of looking out for shots that might be useful in the future is smart. Thank you for your amusing donation: here’s one of mine (one of these days I’ll post a list of the names of other noteworthy Anguilian businesses)

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