Help Wanted—Venues for my participation techniques workshops!

help_664316355_7fb5883812_oThe success of my last request for workshop help has inspired me to ask for more. Traditional meeting venues aren’t always the best fit for participant-driven events, and I’m looking for meeting spaces for my upcoming 1½ day participation techniques workshops that concentrate on inexpensive simplicity and flexibility rather than glitz and expensive high-end features. Over the years, I’ve convened conferences in all kinds of unconventional meeting spaces, such as churches, school auditoria, and corporate entrance halls, so don’t limit your suggestions to conventional venues.

[At the time of writing, I am especially interested in European venues for a February 2017 workshop I am planning with Jan-Jaap In der Maur. If you know a possible candidate, please get in touch ASAP!]

If you’ve worked with me before, you’ll know that I am super flexible about making deals that are win-win for everyone involved. (Example: Let us use your organization’s space in return for reduced/free fees for employees.) So let me know what you want and let’s see what we can create together!

Here’s what I need.

Minimum requirements
Location: Within reasonable (1 hour) reach of an airport. Includes or is close to appropriate accommodations. (Most, if not all, participants will need to stay overnight for at least one day; some for as many as three.)

Space: Ideally 2,500 sq. ft. (~230 square meters) or larger space that is substantially clear of pillars, fixed furniture/obstructions. Smaller spaces may be acceptable, depending on layout and attendance.

Furnishings: One moveable chair for each participant (25 – 40). A few tables.

Inexpensive A/V:

  • A digital projector and screen. (We have been quoted obligatory fees for a two-day rental that exceed the cost to buy a nice projector and screen. And a “technician” was extra.) At a pinch, we could use a large flat-screen TV and my laptop.
  • Appropriate sound reinforcement for workshops with over ~25 participants, including:
    • either a genuine Countryman E6 headset (1st choice) or a high quality lav wireless mike (2nd choice).
    • a handheld wireless mike plus stand.

Food and beverage:

  • Light provisions for one mid-morning and two mid-afternoon breaks.
  • Water, tea and coffee service available during the 1½ day workshop.
  • One dinner and one lunch. Breakfast optional (though it must be available locally.)

Nice to have
Some 48″ – 60″ rounds.

A second handheld wireless mike plus stand. (Nice to have, but only needed for larger workshops.)

An available second adjacent smaller room would be great.

Things to avoid
Venues that require using expensive house suppliers of food & beverage and A/V.

I am happy for the venue to be beautiful/interesting/impressive, but don’t want to spend participants’ fees on glitz.

Please help!
Know a venue that would be a great fit? Own one? Then please contact me now, using the form below. Thanks!

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Your Suggested Venue(s) Region(s) (pick one or more)
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Image attribution: Flickr user tudor

Asking for help

Asking_for_help_9401173747_98abe42405_k

Sometimes, the best thing we can do is to ask for help.

I had been fretting for several months on how to move ahead on convening and facilitating more of the participation technique workshops that are dear to my heart. What would the interest be? How would I market them? Which countries and venues should I consider?

The exploratory work involved was daunting. I started some market and venue research in my spare time, but progress was slow. There was so much to do before I could even begin to announce anything.

Finally, I realized I was acting like the person (stereotypically a man, right?) who’s lost and can’t bring himself to ask for directions.

I needed to ask for help.

It was hard for me to get to the point of asking for help. Despite knowing and preaching about the power of networks to create change, I was trained to figure stuff out by myself, and I still often revert to that old mindset. My ingrained instinct is to investigate a situation by looking at possibilities, only finally moving to action once I’ve got a solid plan. Sometimes that’s a good strategy. But sometimes, I need to practice transformational tourism.

Merely looking at [or listening to] something almost never causes change. Tourism is fun, but rarely transformative.

If it was easy, you would have already achieved the change you seek.

Change comes from new habits, from acting as if, from experiencing the inevitable discomfort of becoming.
Transformation tourism, Seth Godin

I became someone who asks for help. In 30 minutes I wrote a request for assistance on this blog and promoted it through my usual channels on social media: Twitter, LinkedIn, Google Plus, and some Facebook event professional groups.

The results were swift and gratifying.

Within a week I had been contacted by numerous friends and colleagues, and had found several partners who were a wonderful logical fit.

Two weeks later, we began planning workshops in the United States, Canada, and Europe!

I hope I’ve learned something. I hope that next time I’ll be ready to ask for help a little sooner.

How about you? Don’t be like this guy.

Try a new habit.

Ask for help.

You may be amazed at what happens when you do.

Photo attribution: Flickr user marinadelcastell