Comments on: What I’ve learned about working productively https://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/personal-effectiveness/2012/08/what-ive-learned-about-working-productively/ Unconferences, peer conferences, participant-driven events, and facilitation Fri, 17 May 2019 18:59:30 +0000 hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.3.2 By: Adrian Segar https://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/personal-effectiveness/2012/08/what-ive-learned-about-working-productively/#comment-1918 Sun, 12 Aug 2012 13:22:00 +0000 http://www.conferencesthatwork.com/?p=3023#comment-1918 Sachin, you bring up another good reason to work in sprints not marathons. Working for long periods without a break simply isn’t fun, and usually saps your passion for your work quickly. Thanks!

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By: Interview Question https://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/personal-effectiveness/2012/08/what-ive-learned-about-working-productively/#comment-1917 Sun, 12 Aug 2012 11:52:00 +0000 http://www.conferencesthatwork.com/?p=3023#comment-1917 I like the idea “Work in sprints, not marathons” it works for me as well. I am a Java developer and also running a Java blog. At starting I was pretty passionate (still is) about it and working day and night. But after toiling hard with it, I found my passion is decaying day by day. Then I learn, enjoying my work but not to toil hard with it and get bored.

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By: Adrian Segar https://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/personal-effectiveness/2012/08/what-ive-learned-about-working-productively/#comment-1915 Tue, 07 Aug 2012 21:46:00 +0000 http://www.conferencesthatwork.com/?p=3023#comment-1915 How could I have forgotten to include the importance of exercise?! A great addition Sue!

“In-box zero” is indeed a satisfying state, but I only achieve it with copious use of a “pending” folder, which feels a bit like cheating. (There are always plenty of tasks for which I’m waiting for input from others before I can proceed.)

I think you must be more disciplined than me, because I am unable to predict how many of my non-time-sensitive to-do list items will get done by the end of the day/week/month. I wonder how you’re so good at that. Admirable!

Thanks for sharing Sue!

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By: Sue Pelletier https://www.conferencesthatwork.com/index.php/personal-effectiveness/2012/08/what-ive-learned-about-working-productively/#comment-1914 Tue, 07 Aug 2012 21:32:00 +0000 http://www.conferencesthatwork.com/?p=3023#comment-1914 I’ll have to try your sprint idea. I tend to get caught up in something and three hours later surface for air only to realize most of my body has fallen asleep!

This may just be a work-in-a-home-office essential, but I’ve had to be very deliberate about making sure I get face time with real humans a few times a day. Also, when I find myself getting the after-lunch sleepies, doing something at least mildly vigorous works better than coffee to wake me up again (say 20 jumping jacks or a quick run around the block).

Another key for me is to make sure my e-mail in box is empty at the end of each day. Yes, it can be done, and it feels really, really good.

Again, maybe not for everyone, but I live and die by my to-do lists (daily, weekly, monthly). Crossing everything off the day’s list is almost as good as having the empty in-box come 6 o’clock.

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